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Råå


Alliances
After the death of Karl X Gustav Sweden was governed by regency headed by Gabriel De La Gardie. After the peace in Copenhagen the foreign policy was a matter of avoiding war and the guarding of the Danish border. This was to be done by a balance policy between the great power blocks of Europe.
Opposite the big power France stood a union between Austria, Holland, Spain and Brandenburg. In 1672 Sweden approached France and they formed an alliance. When the European Great War began Denmark joined Sweden´s enemies and when France succeeded in making Sweden go to war against Brandenburg, Denmark and Sweden ended up on different sides in the European conflict. When the Swedes were defeated in Swedish Pomerania, the Danes attacked Sweden seeing the opportunity to revenge the disastrous defeat in 1658.

Danish Attack
The Dutch and Danish fleet defeated the Swedish fleet south of Øland in the summer of 1676. The Swedish battle ship Kronan, at the time the biggest warship in Europe, was sunk.
On the command of the Danish king Christian V around 15.000 men were landed in Rå south of Helsingborg and subsequently the citizens of Helsingborg pledged allegiance to the Danish king. Furthermore a Danish mayor was elected.
The Danish Invasion Fleet 1676
The Danish Invasion Fleet 1676
The Naval Battle of Øland
The Naval Battle of Øland
The Invasion Fleet on its Way to Råå
The Invasion Fleet on its Way to Råå
The Capture of Helsingborg
The Capture of Helsingborg

A Bloody War
The Scanian was a cruel and bloody war, which mainly took place on Scanian soil. The Danes drove the Swedes back and gained control over all of Scania except Malmo. Many Scanians joined the Danes. Violent battles were fought at Christiansstad, Halmstad, Lund and Landskrona.
The Battle of Lund was the bloodiest battle ever fought between Denmark and Sweden. The young king Karl XI led the Swedish troops. The battle turned the war in favour of the Swedes and they were able to drive the Danish troops back. At the end the Danes only held Landskrona and Helsingborg, but they were forced to face the fact that the situation was hopeless. Thousands of refugees crossed the Sound to Denmark.
The Citadel in Landskrona
The Citadel in Landskrona
The Capture of Landskrona
The Capture of Landskrona
The Capture of Landskrona
The Capture of Landskrona
Landskrona Surrenders to Christian V
Landskrona Surrenders to Christian V
The Siege of Christiansstad 1676
The Siege of Christiansstad 1676
The Capture of Christiansstad
The Capture of Christiansstad
The Battle of Lund 1676
The Battle of Lund 1676
The Battle of Lund 1676
The Battle of Lund 1676
The Battle of Lund 1676
The Battle of Lund 1676
The Battle of Lund 1676
The Battle of Lund 1676
Karl XI
Karl XI
The Battle of Malmo 1677
The Battle of Malmo 1677
The Battle of Landskrona 1677
The Battle of Landskrona 1677
The Battle of Tirups Hed, Landskrona
The Battle of Tirups Hed, Landskrona
The Battle in Køge Bay 1677
The Battle in Køge Bay 1677

Anti-Swedish Alliance
The young Swedish king Karl XII, who succeeded his father Carl XI, was opposed by an alliance of states, which demanded revenge after Sweden´s conquests in the 17th century. Denmark, Russia and Saxony (including Poland) were in this alliance. However at this time Sweden were well prepared. Carl XI, who had also reformed the defence, which at this time consisted of 65.000 men and 38 war ships, had built a new naval port in Karlskrona. Finally the new border with Denmark at the Sound had been fortified extensively.
In the year 1700 a Swedish army under the command of Carl XII was transported from Helsingborg and Landskrona to Humlebæk in Zealand. Copenhagen was threatened and Denmark was forced to make a separate peace.
Carl XII continued his expedition towards Russia and Poland and advanced in eastern Europe, but when the Swedish fortune of war changed in the Battle of Poltava (1709) Denmark declared war on Sweden.
Karl 12.
Karl 12.
The Swedes´ Landing in Humlebæk
The Swedes´ Landing in Humlebæk
The Bombardment of Copenhagen
The Bombardment of Copenhagen

The Danish Helsingborg
The Danish main forces, which included 14.000 men landed in Råå in November 1709. Helsingborg defended itself with a garrison of 360 men and a Swedish unit of 1500 men were in the area around Rå. They could not defend the town and retreated.
Frederik IV took up headquarters in alderman Schlyter´s farm in the central Helsingborg and its citizens pledged allegiance to the Danish king. In Helsingborg Danish church services were introduced a Danish almanac according to the Gregorian calendar. This involved a difference of ten days.
Herman Schlyter´s House
Herman Schlyter´s House

Magnus Stenbock in Helsingborg
The Swedish king was far away, so Magnus Stenbock, who was Scania´s general governor, organized the Swedish defence. He gathered a large army in Småland, as the Danes had entered Sweden all the way up to Karlshamn in Blekinge. Stenbock succeeded in gathering 16.000 men, who went into Scania in the end of January 1710. The Danes retreated towards Helsingborg and took up position north of town under the command of major general Rantzau.
February 28th 1710 the two armies clashed in the battle of Ringstorp outside Helsingborg, and it ended in a crushing Danish defeat, which Stenbock´s courier, Henrik Hammarberg reported to Stockholm.
Stenbock, Magnus
Stenbock, Magnus
Message of the Victory of Magnus Stenbock
Message of the Victory of Magnus Stenbock
Memorial Stone for the Battle of Helsingborg
Memorial Stone for the Battle of Helsingborg
Fortification of the Swedish Coast
Fortification of the Swedish Coast
Helsingborg 2010
Helsingborg 2010

©  Øresundstid 2009